Nonfatal workplace injuries are probably a lot more expensive than most people (and their employers) realize. According to research published in Injury Prevention, the average nonfatal workplace injury costs $1,590 and 11 days of lost productivity. Researchers examined millions of workplace-related insurance claims between 2014 and 2015 to look for information on the economic impact of worker injuries.

The injuries included things like falls, accidental poisonings, traffic accidents, overexertion injuries and injuries involving the use of machinery, among other things. The study aimed to provide a little more clarity regarding the real losses associated with different kinds of injuries since previous studies had only examined overall absenteeism following injuries.

Among their findings, researchers discovered that insect bites and stings may cause a worker as little as 1.5 days off work, while something like a head or face injury could cause a worker to miss anywhere from four days on the job to 20. The hospital bills associated with nonfatal work injuries ranged from $210 to $6,196.

Ultimately, researchers concluded that “Non-fatal injuries are preventable and incur substantial lost work productivity at a high cost to individuals, employers and society.” This kind of information can help employers take a better look at what they can do to make workplaces safer for everyone.

Workplace injuries cause about 30 million visits to the emergency room every year — and the total costs exceed $133 billion. If you happen to be an injured worker, however, the true cost may be measured in pain, suffering and financial instability due to your lost time at work. Find out more about your right to compensation and treatment after a workplace injury.